Health articles

X-rays, even in low dose, may harm your heart

X-rays, even in low dose, may harm your heart

X-rays, even in low dose, may harm your heart

Even low exposure to ionising radiation, such as X-rays, may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, a study has cautioned. The findings indicated that an individuals’ exposure to X-rays, even at around 0.5 Gy — which is equivalent to recurrent CT scan imaging — is associated with a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular damage, up

Why do women fall prey to eating disorders?

Why do women fall prey to eating disorders?

A woman’s desire to diet and seek a slim body may depend on the attractiveness of a romantic partner, a study has found, highlighting the fairer sex’s risk of developing eating disorders. The study showed that women who were evaluated as less attractive were more motivated to diet and be thin if their husbands or

Breastfeeding linked to reduced risk of MS

Breastfeeding linked to reduced risk of MS

Mothers who breastfeed for at least 15 months over one or more pregnancies may be 53 per cent less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with those who do not breastfeed at all or do so for up to four months, a study has claimed. MS is a disease in which the immune system

Artificial sweeteners may up obesity, heart disease risk

Artificial sweeteners may up obesity, heart disease risk

Worried about your ever increasing waistline? Cut down the use of artificial sweeteners as they may be associated with long-term weight gain and increased risk of obesity, a study has warned. Artificial sweeteners are substitutes for sugar that provides a sweet taste like that of sugar while containing significantly less food energy. The findings showed

Simple test may warn of bladder cancer's return

Simple test may warn of bladder cancer’s return

Researchers have devised a simple test for an earlier and more accurate warning of returning bladder cancer than existing methods. Testing the urine of 348 bladder cancer patients for a faulty protein called TERT, researchers from the University Hospital of Lyon in France found that the test was able to predict when the cancer was

Here's good news for coffee lovers: They live longer

Here’s good news for coffee lovers: They live longer

Drinking coffee could lead to a longer life, according to a new study reported by US researchers at the University Of Southern California (USC). In a study of more than 180,000 participants, the researchers found that people who drank regular or decaffeinated coffee experienced health benefits, such as increased longevity. The researchers report in the

Diabetes, sleep apnoea may accelerate risk of eye disease

Diabetes, sleep apnoea may accelerate risk of eye disease

Diabetes patients who are also suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea may be at greater risk of developing a common form of eye disease leading to blindness, researchers found. Diabetic retinopathy — the most common form of eye disease — affects between 40 and 50 per cent of patients with diabetes. The findings showed that the

Childhood obesity may lead to hip disease

Childhood obesity may lead to hip disease

Obesity may put children at increased risk of hip disease, a condition that can cause life-long morbidity, suggests new research. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood. “Ultimately

coffee

Here’s good news for coffee lovers: They live longer

Drinking coffee could lead to a longer life, according to a new study reported by US researchers at the University Of Southern California (USC). In a study of more than 180,000 participants, the researchers found that people who drank regular or decaffeinated coffee experienced health benefits, such as increased longevity. The researchers report in the

Western diet, gene may fuel risk of Alzheimer's

Western diet, gene may fuel risk of Alzheimer’s

Consuming a western diet that is high in cholesterol, fat and sugar may influence the development of Alzheimer’s disease in people who carry a gene linked to the neurodegenerative disease, a study showed. ApoE4 and ApoE3 are two variants of a gene that codes for a protein, apolipoprotein E, which binds fats and cholesterol. While

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